Making Canada Home: How Immigrants Shaped This Country

Posted by kevin on November 17, 2016
Making Canada Home

Tell us a bit about your book and how it came to be.

Making Canada Home is about a topic that is fundamental to understanding and appreciating our country: immigration. When asked where they “came from,” everyone living in Canada except perhaps First Nations and Metis individuals will point to an “away” country on the map, and say “there.” Everyone living in Canada has a story about how he or she came to be here.

Dance of the Banished by Marsha Forchuk Skrypuch

Posted by kevin on November 5, 2016
Dance of the Banished by Marsha Skrypuch

Tell us a bit about your book and how it came to be.

Dance of the Banished begins in 1913 in the Ottoman Empire with two young lovers about to part ways. Ali accepts an opportunity to have his way paid to Canada, but by doing so, he breaks a promise to his fiancé, Zeynep as they had pledged to come together. He thinks he can save enough money to buy passage for Zeynep, but before he can do that, the First World War begins.

The Vimy Trap or, How We Learned To Stop Worrying and Love the Great War

Posted by kevin on November 5, 2016
The Vimy Trap

Tell us a bit about your book and how it came to be.

The Vimy Trap is a follow-up to Warrior Nation: Rebranding Canada in an Age of Anxiety (2012), a book that I wrote with McKay. It was published just as the Harper government was attempting to make the bicentennial of the War of 1812 into a great patriotic spasm, a key founding moment for Canada. Their effort flopped, but our book did well, as it was an early analysis of just how wedded the Harperites were to a nation-forged-in-fire narrative.

Air-Crazy: Fascinating stories of Canadian women in the air - By Elizabeth Gillan Muir

Posted by kevin on October 9, 2016
Air-Crazy: Fascinating stories of Canadian women in the air

Tell us a bit about your book.

This is the story of Canadian women in aviation, from the time they became passengers on planes, then pilots and stewardesses, and finally astronauts. Aviation was a man’s world, and not only were pilots male, but at first women were discouraged even from being passengers. So, I begin in 1912 when a woman in B.C. was one of the first airplane passengers on a plane in Canada. Finally in 1928, a Canadian woman was licenced to be a pilot, and eventually women became astronauts and a woman was even the commander of the Snowbirds.

 

Maple Moon by Connie Brummel Crook

Posted by kevin on September 8, 2016
Maple Moon

Tell us a bit about your book and how it came to be.

Maple Moon is a story of how people may first have learned how to make maple syrup. I came up with the idea when I was doing research for my novel The Hungry Year, which describes the effects of the famine of 1787–88 on a pioneer family living in the woods of Upper Canada. I found several legends about maple syrup and learned how the Missisauga were the first to discover that life-giving food.

A World We Have Lost by Bill Waiser

Posted by kevin on August 25, 2016
A World We Have Lost by Bill Waiser

Tell us a bit about your book and how it came to be.

The idea for A World We Have Lost originated at a Regina conference in the fall of 2005.I had been asked to reflect on my new centennial history of the province (Saskatchewan: A New History) as part of a session on the writing of Saskatchewan history.In my remarks, I noted that the front end of the story–the period before Saskatchewan became a province–had to be re-visited and re-considered in light of the new work in the area.After mulling it over, I decided towrite a compendium piece to my centennial history of the prov

Queers Were Here: Heroes & Icons of Queer Canada

Posted by kevin on July 15, 2016
Queers Were Here: Heroes & Icons of Queer Canada

What drew you to write about this topic?

Originally the idea arose in discussions between the two of us and Jeet Heer. We wanted the stories of LGBTQ Canadians to be told in a manner that was approachable for a broad audience. We then approached Dan Wells at Biblioasis pitching the idea as a collection for his press. We hoped that the pieces, which are written in the here and now by contemporary authors about people who came before, would show how queer culture and identity travels over time and space.

Toronto’s Poor: A Rebellious History

Posted by kevin on July 4, 2016

Tell us a bit about your book and how it came to be. 

The book is the product of a rather unique collaboration. One of us, Gaetan Heroux, is an anti-poverty activist, while the other, Bryan D. Palmer, is a historian of Canada with a longstanding interest in labour. We connected with each other through our mutual interests in the Ontario Coalition Against Poverty, with which Heroux has worked for decades and which Palmer has supported.

Steve Paikin on Bill Davis

Posted by kevin on June 16, 2016
Bill Davis by Steve Paikin

Tell us a bit about your book and how it came to be.

I’ve been bugging former Ontario Premier Bill Davis to write his memoirs for at least a decade. He first got elected in 1959, then was premier for 14 years. He’s almost 87 today and has more institutional knowledge about politics in Canada than anyone I know. So I’m glad I was finally able to prevail upon him to cooperate with my efforts to write a biography about him.

 

An interview with Gisela Sherman

Posted by admin on March 25, 2016

Gisela Tobien Sherman is an author, actor and writing instructor. She is a two-time winner of the Hamilton and Region Arts Council Award for Best Children’s Book of the Year. Her latest book is the Young Adult novel, The Farmerettes (Second Story Press), a story about a group of mismatched girls who live and work together on a farm in the summer of 1943, when millions of men left Canada to fight overseas in World War II, leaving a gap in farm labour that would be filled in by women and girls.